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APPLICATION OF DERIVATIVES

IN REAL LIFE AND OTHER


SCIENCE
SUBJECTS
AND
RELATED RATE PROBLEMS:
Zainab Masroor _ Real Life
Zainab Tariq _ Mathematics
Madiha _ Computer science
Rabia _ Architecture
Liaba Akram _ Chemistry
Mahnoor _ Economics
Usma _ Physics

USE OF DERIVATIVE IN DAILY


LIFE:
DERIVATIVES:
Derivatives are constantly used in everyday
life to help measure how much something is
changing.

It is used in history, for predicting the life of a


stone.
It is used in geography, which is used to study the
gases present in the atmosphere.

COUNT

It is mainly used in daily by pilots to measure


the pressure and the air.
It is use in Shipwrecks occurred because the ship
was not where the captain thought it should be.
Derivatives are met in many engineering and
science problems, especially modeling the
behavior of moving object.

EXAMPLE
A 20 m ladder leans against a wall. The top slides down at a
rate of 4m/s. how fast is the bottom of the ladder moving
when it is 16m from the wall?

Solution:

20m

4m / s dy / dt
y
x

COUNT.
Now the relation between x and y is:
x+y=20
Now differentiating throughout w.r.t time

That is
Now we know:
And we need to know the horizontal velocity (dx/dt) when
X=16
the only other unknown is y, which we obtain using Pythagoras
theorem

COUNT.
Y=
Y=
Y=12
So
(16)

+(12)(-4)
=3m/s

APPLICATIONS OF DERIVATIVES IN
MATHEMATICS:

Presented by Zainab Tariq

DERIVATIVES:
In mathematics, the derivative is a way to
represent rate of change, that is - the
amount by which a function is changing at
one given point . The derivative is often
written using "dy over dx" (meaning the
difference in y divided by the difference in
x.

DEFINITION OF DERIVATIVES:
The instantaneous rate of change of a function, and the
instantaneous velocity of an object at

all required us
to compute the following limit.

We also saw that with a small change of notation this limit


could also be written as,

This is such an important limit and it arises in so many places


that we give it a name. We call it aderivative.
Hence thederivative off(x)with respect toxis the
function and is defined as,

RELATED RATE PROBLEM


Assume that oil spilled from a ruptured tanker spreads in a
circular pattern whose radius increases at a constant rate
of 2 ft/s. How fast is the area of the spill increasing when
the radius of the spill is 60 ft?
Solution:
Let
t = number of seconds elapsed from the time of the spill
r = radius of the spill in feet after t seconds
A = area of the spill in square feet after t seconds
We know the rate at which the radius is increasing, and we
want to find the rate at which the area is increasing at the
instant when r = 60; that is, we want to find

dA\dt at r=60

given that dr\dt = 2 ft/s

CONT
This suggests that we look for an equation relating A
and r that we can differentiate with respect to t to
produce a relationship between dA/dt and dr/dt.
But A is the area of a circle of radius r, so
A = r2
Differentiating both sides of (1) with respect to t
yields
dA/dt = 2rdr\dt
Thus, when r = 60 the area of the spill is increasing at
the rate of
dA\dt
at r=60
= 2(60)(2) = 240 ft2/s 754 ft2/s

APPLICATIONS OF
DERIVATIVES IN
ARCHITECTURE
BY
Rabia Yasin

LET US FIRST DISCUSS WHAT


THE ARCHITECTURE IS?

ARCHITECTURE IS DEFINED AS :

The art or practice of designing and


constructing building
The style in which a building is designed and
constructed, especially with regard to a
specific period, place or culture.
The complex or carefully designed structure
of something.
The conceptual structure and logical
organization of a computer or computer
based system.

EXAMPLE 1:

A 15 foot ladder is resting against the wall.


The bottom is initially 10 feet away from the
wall and is being pushed towards the wall at
a rate of 1/4 ft./sec. How fast is the top of
the ladder moving up the wall 12 seconds
after we start pushing

SOLUITON:

Weve defined the distance of the bottom of the


ladder from the wall to be x and the distance of the
top of the ladder from the floor to be y. Note as
well that these are changing with time and so we
really should write x(t) and y( . However, as is
often the case with related rates/implicit
differentiation problems we dont write the part
just try to remember this in our heads as we
proceed with the problem.

Next we need to identify what we know and what


we want to find. We know that the rate at which
the bottom of the ladder is moving towards the
wall. This is
x = 1/4
Note as well that the rate is
negative since the distance from the wall, x, is
decreasing. We always need to be careful with
signs with these problems.

We want to find the rate at which the top of


the ladder is moving away from the floor.
This is y . Note as well that this quantity
should be positive since y will be increasing.
As with the first example we first need a
relationship between x and y. We can get
this using Pythagorean Theorem
x + y = (15) = 225

All that we need to do at this point is to


differentiate both sides with respect to t,
remembering that x and y are really functions of
t and so well need to do implicit differentiation.
Doing this gives an equation that shows the
relationship between the derivatives
2xx + 2yy = 0
(1)
Next, lets see which of the various parts of this
equation that we know and what we need to find.
We know x and are being asked to determine y
so its okay that we dont know that. However,
we still need to determine x and y.

Determining x and y is actually fairly simple.


We know that initially x=10and the end is
being pushed in towards the wall at a rate of
1/4ft./sec and that we are interested in
what has happened after 12 seconds. We
know that
distance = rate time
=(1/4)(12)
=3

So, the end of the ladder has been pushed in 3 feet and so after 12
seconds we must have . Note that we could have computed this in
one step as follows
x = 10 (12)
To find y (after 12 seconds) all that we need to do is reuse the
Pythagorean Theorem with the values of x that we just found above
y=225 x = 225 -49 = 176
Now all that we need to do is plud into (1) and solve for y
2(7)(-1/4) + 2(176)y = 0
y = (7/4)/176 =7 / 4176=0.1319 ft/sec

Notice that we got the correct sign for y . If


wed a negative we would have known that
we had made a mistake and we could go
back and look for it

Application of derivates in
chemistry
Presented by Laiba Akram

Chemistry and ideal gas laws involving use of


derivates:
The properties of gases have been studied for
centuries, and it has been found that many gases satisfy
an approximate relationship called theIdeal Gas
Lawwhich states that
PV=nRT
Where

EXAMPLE # 1 :
Boyles law for confined gas states that if the
temperature is constant , PV = c, where P is pressure ,
V is volume and c is constant. At a certain instant the
volume is 75 in, the pressure is 30 lb/inch and
pressure is decreasing at a rate of 2 lb/in every
minute. At what rate is the volume changing at this
instant ?

DATA :
P = 30 lb/in
V = 75 in
dp/dt= -2lb/in per minute
(negative sign is because pressure is decreasing )
dV/ dt= ?

SOLUTION :
As PV = c
Taking derivative :dP/dt .V + P. dV/dt (1) = 0

dP/dt .V + P. dV/dt = 0

P. dV/dt = - dP/dt .P

dV/dt = - V/P . dP/dt

dV/dt = - (-2) (75/30)

dV/dt = 5 in per minute

hence rate of volume is increasing

r
e
t
u
p
Com
Science

Presented by:
Madiha Hafeez

Definition:

The science that deals with the


theory and methods of processing
information in digital computers,
the design of computer hardware
and software, and the applications
of computers

Application of derivative in computer


science:

Scientific computing
Graphs and visuals
Robotics

Motions

Controls

Machine learning
Human effort
Reliability

Program
example:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<maths.h>
#include <codecogs/maths/calculus/diff/taylor.h>
{
int x;
x=sin
// function to differentiate
return define(derivative);
}
Output:
function to differentiate=sin x
Sin x=cos x

Related rate
problem:

Example:
A circle grows at the rate of 8 in2 per
second, at what rate is the radius growing
when the radius is 2 inches?
Solution:
dr/dt=?
dA/dt=8,r=2
let A be the area of a circle
so A=r2
by differentiating, we get
dA/dt=2r. dr/dt
by putting values
8=22.dr/dt
dr/dt=2 in2 per second
so the radius is growing at the rate of 2 in2 per
second

Program example:
find a program in which a circle grows at the
rate of 8 in2 per second, at what rate is the
radius growing when the radius is 2 inches?
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
#include<maths.h>
#include<derivative.h>
{
int Area,Radius;
Area=r2;
def derivate(Area):
Area=ans**derivate(Radius);
def derivative(Radius);
Growing rate of radius(int Area,Area,);
}
Output :
Area= r2
Derivative(Area):2r.
Derivate(Radius)
Insert values:8,22.
Growing rate of radius:2 in2 per

APPLICATIONS OF DERIVATIVES IN
ECONOMICS PRESENTED BY
MAHNOOR SIDDIQ

APPLICATION OF DERIVATIVES IN
ECEONOMICS.

There are two derivatives.

Marginal revenue function.


Marginal cost function.

MARGINAL REVENUE FUNCTION

Marginal revenue function is the derivative


of total revenue function.
MR = del TR/ del Q
= d TR /d Q

MARGINAL COST FUNCTION

In economics the marginal cost function is


defined as the derivative of total cost
function.
MC = del TC / del Q
= d TC / d Q

PROFIT FUNCTION

In economics the profit function is defined to


be :
Profit function = TR TC
(Profit ) = MR MC
= d TR / d Q d TC /d Q

EXAMPLE

Pulsar manufactures a series of 20 in flat tube


digital television . The weekly total cost
incurred by pulsar for producing x sets is.
C (x) = 0.000002x^3 -0.02x^2 +120x + 60,000
The Revenue function is
R(x) = -0.006x^2 + 180x
Find the marginal cost function , marginal
revenue function and the profit function P ?

SOLUTION
Profit function = R (x) c(x)
=-0.006x^2 + 180x - 0.000002x^3
+0.02x^2 120x 60000
=0.000002x^3 + 0.014x^2 + 60x
-60000

SOLUTION
Marginal cost function = dC / dx
= .000006x^2
Marginal Revenue function =
dR /dx = -0.012x 0.04
Marginal profit function= dP /dx
= -0.000006x^2 +0.028x +60