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REGION 11 MATH & SCIENCE TEACHER ACADEMY 2010-2011

PLC FACILITATOR TRAINING

Presented by: Linda Harvieux

Introductions
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Fortune Cookie: Read your fortune and share with your group, How does your fortune relate to your experience working in a team (grade-level, leadership, life experiences, or any team youve been on)?

Agenda
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What is a PLC? Facilitator Skills The Role of the Leader Forming the PLC Structuring the PLC Weekly Focus Action Plan

Evolution of the Professional Learning Community


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Read article. In small groups discuss the differences between a PLC and a traditional team meeting using Talking Chips. Create a graphic organizer to record the differences and share with the whole group.

Record Your Strategies


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As we work through our time together, please document the different facilitation strategies being modeled. Strategy Description How might you use?

Break

Roadblocks
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Using the set of road signs on your table, reflect on the roadblocks you have experienced in the past. What barriers have you experienced in your PLC?

Landmarks
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Use the set of landmarks on your table to identify evidence of moving beyond the roadblocks. What benchmarks will lead to positive developments in your PLC?

Teamwork
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Teams bring together complementary skills and experience that exceed those of any individual on the team.

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Teams are more effective with problem solving.

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Teams provide a social dimension that enhances work.

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Teams motivate and foster peer pressure and internal accountability.

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Teams have more fun!

Scheduling

How will your team schedule your 4 1 hour meetings?


Ideas,

suggestions, support from leadership

The Principal/Leaders Role Emulate Instructional Leadership by:


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Initiating structures and systems Posing the right questions Modeling what is valued Celebrating progress Leading for change

Six Characteristics of a PLC


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Shared mission, vision, values and goals Collaborative teams focused on learning Collective inquiry into best practice Action orientation and experimentation Commitment to continuous improvement Results orientation

DuFour, R., DuFour, R., & Eaker, R. (2008).

Professional Learning Communities


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Something we are not something we do.


Muhammad, A. (2009).

The Four Questions


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What is it we expect the students to learn? How will we know when they have learned it? How will we respond when they dont learn? How will we respond when they already know it?

DuFour, R., DuFour, R., & Eaker, R. (2008).

Technical Change vs. Cultural Change


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Technical Develop the team Structures: Time, team development Protocols: Agendas and meeting logs Collecting and sharing data

Cultural Change: All Students Can Learn


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Believers Tweeners Survivors Fundamentalists

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LUNCH

Video
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Group Process Facilitator


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One who contributes structure and process to interactions so groups are able to function effectively. A helper and enabler whose goal is to support others as they achieve exceptional performance. - Bens, 2002

Group Process Facilitation


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A way of providing leadership without taking the reins. A facilitators job is to get others to assume responsibility, to take the lead, and engage in meaningful collaboration.
-Bens, 2002

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Group Process Facilitators:


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Do not have all the answers, are not content experts. Stay neutral, if you must move out of facilitator role and into role as participating member of group identify that move. Are responsible for room set-up that supports effective teams. Listen; demonstrate that you are by using verbal and non-verbal cues. Paraphrase or clarify for the benefit of all members of the group. Watch the time (or appoint a timekeeper).

PLC Facilitator Toolkit


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Setting the Stage Tools (fortune cookies, roadblocks) Facilitation Tools (agendas, logs, norms, fist to five consensus) Discussion/Process Tools (process cards, talking chips) Reflection Tools (stoplight, exit cards) Resources/Articles (websites, video clips, websites)

Toolkit Continued
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Play ping pong - redirect questions by sending to others rather than answering yourself.
Use humor appropriate humor! Call and identify sidetracks Park-it sheets record all sidetrack items. Encourage all group members to acknowledge dysfunctional behaviors as they occur! Use the imaginary spell check button spell creatively.
-Bens, 2002
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Facilitator Role Process


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The Job of a Facilitator is

The Job of a Team Member is

The Job of a Facilitator is not

The Job of a Team Member is not

The Agenda As Your Guide


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An agenda helps team members come prepared. An agenda brings focus to your team discussions. Focus questions help define the goal of the PLC session. Logging your conversation provides data for future analysis.
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Using the Agenda as a Log


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Date:

PLC Facilitator: Recorder:

Members Present:

Members Absent:

In This Section: Team roles are recorded Document member participation to keep all members accountable and informed
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Team Norms

Non-Negotiables
Define essential learning and use common assessments Everyone participates and works toward the common goal achievement for all students Teams make individual norms and honor their team norms

Norms:

-adapted from DuFour, et. al.

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Norms
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Centerpiece Activity

Working in your group, first silently respond to the norm cards in the middle of the table, one at a time. After time is called, take each one and read aloud the ideas created as a group. Synthesize the ideas into one all-encompassing statement. Describe how that norm with look document for future reference.

Your Team Focus


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Team Topic/Focus:

Todays Focus:
Four Questions:
What do we expect the students to learn? How will we respond when they dont learn? How will we know when they have learned it? How will we respond when they already know it?

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Agenda Sample
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Team Focus: 3rd Grade Math fluency.


*Benchmark: Compute 3-digit addition number sentences with 90% accuracy by the end of the first trimester.

This weeks discussion questions: *What do we expect our students to learn and how will they learn it? -What is sufficient accuracy? -Does accuracy guarantee comprehension? -What skills does an accurate math student use?

-What support is needed to increase comprehension?


-What strategies will we use to increase accuracy?
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The Four PLC Questions


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What do we expect the students How will we know when they to learn? have learned it?

(And how will they learn it?)

How will we respond when they dont learn?

How will we respond when they already know it?

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Reflecting on your Learning


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Reflection: What did we learn about teaching our content? What did we learn about our students?

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Planning for the Next Meeting


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For Next Time:

Things to do:

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Moving Forward:
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Action Plan:
How

will you inform your team? What will your weekly structure look like? What will your agenda look like? What will you include in your log?

Learning Opportunity Task #1


Please read Pgs. 28-32, in Learning By Doing, for our next session.

Learning Opportunity Task #2


Celebrations and Solutions Using the form provide, walk your team through a discussion about the Celebrations and Solutions/hurdles that you have experienced thus far in your PLC. Please bring this to the next session.

Exit Cards
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Region 11 - Math & Science Teacher Academy 2010-2011


PLC Facilitator Training
August, 2010

EXIT CARD
3 Things you learned 2 Questions you have:____________________ (please provide your email if you are requesting a response.) 1 Concept you intend to apply to your classroom/school/PLC -

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References
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Bens, Ingrid. (2002). Facilitation at a Glance. Salem, NH: Goal/QPC.

.DuFour, R., DuFour, R., & Eaker, R. (2008). Revisiting professional learning communities at work: New insights for improving schools. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree.
Dufour, R., DuFour, R., Eaker, R., & Many, T. (2006). Learning by Doing: A Handbook for Professional Learning Communities at Work. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree. Guskey, T. R. (2008) The rest of the story. Educational Leadership, 65(4), 28-35. Hord, S. (2008, Summer). Evolution of the professional learning community. National Staff Development Council, 29 (3), 10-13. Muhammad, A. (2009). Transforming school culture: How to overcome staff division. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree. Stiggins, R. J. (2008) Assessment for learning, the achievement gap, and truly effective schools. Tomlinson, C., & McTighe, J. (2006). Intregrating Differentiated Instruction and Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Tomlinson, C., & McTighe, J. (2006). Intregrating Differentiated Instruction and Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. 42

Resources
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www.allthingsplc.com www.all4ed/about_the_crisis/schools/map www.ascd.org www.echospace.org www.leadandlearn.com www.marzanoandassociates.com www.michaelfullan.ca www.renewalcoaching.com www.wallacefoundation.org/elan


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THANK YOU!